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Pothead Negro murder Skipper James Bain get off on killing white child Paul Gallagher jr

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=562235&in_page_id=1770&ito=1490

How on earth did driver of speedboat that killed our son get off scot-free?

By KITTY DIMBLEBY – More by this author » Last updated at 01:01am on 27th April 2008

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After six years of tireless campaigning for justice for their dead child, it was a crushing moment simply too much to bear.

Paul and Andrea Gallagher had invested their hearts, souls and £50,000 life savings in a fight to bring a manslaughter case against the three men they hold responsible for the death of their son, Paul Jnr.

The two-year-old died from terrible head injuries during what should have been a dream trip for the family to the Bahamas after an out-of-control speedboat ploughed across a crowded beach.

But last week, in a stuffy and crowded courtroom in the Bahamian capital of Nassau, the Gallaghers’ world collapsed.

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Paul and Andrea GallagherHeartbroken: After the judge dismissed the case Paul and Andrea Gallagher screamed in horror after a six year battle for justice for their son

Three-quarters of the way through a two-week manslaughter trial against the boat’s driver James Bain and its owners Clifford Nottage and Evangeless Williamson, Supreme Court Judge Elliot Lockhart abruptly dismissed the case against them.

He ruled there was insufficient evidence of negligence, even though the boat had been unlicensed, had no insurance and Bain had traces of marijuana in his blood – all clear breaches of Bahamian law.

The couple, from Orpington, Kent, screamed in horror as the judge brought the proceedings to an end.

Mrs Gallagher broke down and wept while her husband shouted at the three defendants and had to be ushered from the building.

“It was like a physical blow,” Andrea said yesterday. “I was stunned. I started shaking and collapsed to the floor, crying.

“The last bit of strength I had mustered up to enable me to come to the courtroom, to face them, was knocked out. I literally had no energy left to hold myself up.

“We thought it was an open and shut case. We wanted justice, but also to make the beaches of the Bahamas safer for other holidaymakers.

“Now the judge has given out a firm message – you can break Bahamian law and get away with it.”

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Paul GallagherTragedy: Paul was killed by an out-of-control speedboat as he played in the sand in the Bahamas six years ago

The Gallaghers were told there was no right of appeal and that the struggle that had consumed their lives since the day Paul was killed during a £10,000 ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ holiday in August 2002 had ended without a satisfactory resolution.

“‘We have come back to the Bahamas several times for inquests, police investigations and preliminary hearings,” added Andrea, 41.

“But this time we hoped we would get justice from a jury. We both found it hard to leave our two other children, Heather and Andrew, at home.

“But we felt we had to return to the place where their brother died to fight for justice to honour his memory.

“We were filled with anticipation, hope even. But as we got off the plane, memories of that holiday came flooding back to me – little Paul digging in the sand, then, after the boat hit, our baby lying on the beach with a big chunk of his skull missing – the sand red with his blood.”

Now they are left with a bitter feeling that after struggling to bring the case to court – but winning support from Tony Blair, then-Foreign Office Minister Baroness Symons and a Scotland Yard investigation – they are the victims of a terrible miscarriage of justice.

James BainAccused: Skipper James Bain had his case dismissed despite having traces of marijuana in his blood

“We didn’t expect it at all,” said Paul, 43. “Even though I thought throughout that the judge seemed more sympathetic to the defence, we still thought the ultimate decision would be in the hands of the jury.

“Even if the jury had decided against us, we would have been able to accept it. But by ruling that there was no case to answer, the judge took that away from us.

“Now it is almost as though we have had no trial. We feel as if we have been through all this for nothing.”

The couple both gave evidence on the first day of the trial, two weeks ago. Andrea was in the witness box for two hours.

She said: “It was horrendous. The defence accused me of being a bitter woman waging a vendetta. All I could do was tell the truth – that I am a mother trying to do the right thing for her son.”

The Gallaghers realised the odds were stacked against them right from the start of the hearing when evidence that would have helped their case was ruled inadmissible.

On the last day of the prosecution case, on Thursday, defence counsel J. Henry Bostwick QC asked the judge to rule there was “no case to answer”, claiming the prosecution had shown no evidence of negligence – and that the safety of people on the beach at a private resort could not in Bahamian law be regarded as the responsibility of the boat’s driver.

The judge ruled that Mr Bostwick was correct and that, in effect, the tragedy fell into a legal black hole.

Paul said: “If Bain had been driving a car which had mounted a pavement and hit little Paul, he would have been punished.

“That boat was a powerful machine – 200 horsepower – and Bain had no skipper’s licence or insurance and was under the influence of cannabis.

“How can he not be responsible? The men we know are responsible for the death of our son have got off scot-free.”

Andrea added: “I certainly never want to set foot on that island again. But I do think our fight has been worthwhile. We may not have got the verdict we wanted, but we have achieved a hell of a lot.

“Since Paul died, new water safety laws have been brought in to make the Bahamas safer. Now we can only pray the new laws are upheld and no family will ever have to suffer the way we have.

“This has cost us everything: our life savings, our business and our peace of mind. But we felt the authorities wanted to sweep Paul’s death under the carpet to protect their tourist industry from bad publicity.

“We may not have got justice, but no one can say that we did not try our hardest for little Paul.”

Police: Man Threatens To Stab Quanell X

http://www.click2houston.com/news/15753171/detail.html
PEARLAND, Texas — A man was arrested after he allegedly threatened to stab community activist Quanell X on Monday, KPRC Local 2 reported.

Pearland police said Hunter Martin Ratliff started an argument with Quanell X as he worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness in the 10000 block of F.M. 518 at about 9:30 a.m.

Ratliff made comments that made Quanell X feel threatened and pulled out an open pocketknife, investigators said.

Police said Ratliff, 31, was arrested and charged with making a terroristic threat.

“No injuries occurred and the suspect has been taken into custody without incident,” Sgt. Roy Castillo said.

If found guilty, Ratliff could face up to 180 days in jail and up to a $2,000 fin

 

Laurence Alvin Lovette is the second negro charges in Eve Carsons Murder

Laurence Alvin Lovette Jr., 17, is watches Orange County District Attorney General Jim Woodall speak during his first appearance in Hillsborough, N.C., Friday, March 14, 2008. Lovette is charged with first degree murder and held without bond in the murder of North Carolina University student body president Eve Carson. Lovette was also charged today of first degree murder for Abhijit Mahato, a doctoral student at Duke University, in Durham, N.C. (AP Photo/Sara D. Davis)

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5iU3IVnyNBpy8ooTN4OutE2rKG1pgD8VE2QCG0DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Whenever there’s been a crack to fall through in North Carolina’s legal system, Laurence Lovette and Demario Atwater have found it.

The high school dropouts were convicted of crimes but put back on the street by a system that failed to notice when they were arrested again.

Both are now behind bars, held without bail and charged with murdering two college students.

“We’ve got a lot of kids out there who have a sense of helplessness, with a propensity for violence,” said Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez. “We need to look at the reasons our youth are doing this.”

Lovette, 17, is accused in the slaying of a graduate student at the Duke University, and he and Atwater, 21, are charged in the death of the University of North Carolina student body president.

A third defendant, 19-year-old Stephen Oates, was arrested a few days after the Duke student’s death and charged with murder and more than a dozen robberies. His next court appearance is set for Monday.

Abhijit Mahato, a doctoral student in computational mechanics at Duke, was found in his apartment a few blocks off campus in January. His autopsy said the 29-year-old from Tatangar, India, was shot at point-blank range in the forehead as a pillow was held tightly against his face. His wallet, cell phone and iPod were missing.

Eve Carson was also shot in the head, once in the right temple, her wallet and keys missing. Her body was found March 5 in the middle of a residential street in Chapel Hill about a mile from the North Carolina campus. The death of the student body president sparked a widespread outpouring of grief that led thousands to gather for two campus memorial services the day her body was identified.

The tragedies have brought together two renowned centers of academic excellence separated by just eight miles and defined most often by their fierce rivalry on the basketball court.

Atwater and Lovette were both students at Durham’s Charles E. Jordan High, a school with a diverse student body and test scores that exceed the state and national average. The school produces success stories: Last week, a senior from Jordan won a $100,000 scholarship in the annual Intel Science Talent Search.

Atwater left in 2002; Lovette dropped out sometime last year. After pleading guilty to misdemeanor larceny and breaking and entering for crimes committed last November, Lovette received a two-year suspended sentence and was placed on probation Jan. 16.

Prosecutors believe he and Oates killed Mahato two days later. In the six weeks that followed, authorities in Durham arrested Lovette several times and charged him with nine different crimes, including burglary, car theft, breaking and entering, and resisting arrest. He was released after each arrest.

“I’m not going to second guess what a judge or a prosecutor in another district did,” said Jim Woodall, the prosecutor in neighboring Orange County, where Carson was killed. “It’s a tough job. You have to make hundreds of judgment calls every day. Nobody has a crystal ball.”

The state Department of Correction said efforts to revoke Lovette’s probation hadn’t begun because he had been on probation for such a short time. Robert Lee Guy, director of the state Division of Community Corrections, said probation officers don’t automatically receive information alerting them when one of their charges pleads guilty or is convicted of another crime.

But Guy said the state is investigating Atwater’s case. Convicted in 2005 of breaking and entering, he violated his probation last June when he was convicted — and sentenced again to probation — on a gun charge. It wasn’t until last month that he was served with a probation violation warrant.

Atwater’s court appearance on the probation violation was March 3 — two days before Carson’s death. The case was assigned to the wrong courtroom, Guy said, and rescheduled for later this month. Atwater was also supposed to be under a stricter form of probation that required him to meet weekly with his probation officer, Guy said.

“Most of the time those reviews take place and everything looks above board,” Guy said. “The rarities (are) like this case. … Most of them are not the tragedy of this nature, when you take someone’s life.”

Guy said he can’t speculate whether Carson’s slaying could have been avoided if the system had worked as intended, but he acknowledges: “I think that’s the million-dollar question on everybody’s mind.”

Should either Lovette or Atwater be convicted of first-degree murder, they could fall through one final crack: neither is likely to face a death sentence.

For Lovette, it’s a guarantee. In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court banned the execution of people under 18. For Atwater, it might as well be; since North Carolina resumed executions in 1984 after a break of more than two decades, jurors in Orange County haven’t sentenced anyone to death.

“There are a lot of people who are against the death penalty in Orange County, and there isn’t anything wrong with that,” said Superior Court Judge Carl Fox, who unsuccessfully sought execution in about three dozen cases during his 20 years as the county’s district attorney. “A significant part of the population really aren’t firm believers in the death penalty.”

Black teens try to rob police station/Too bad the police didn’t shoot!

black-teens-rob-police-station-florida.jpg

http://www.newsnet14.com/2008/03/14/black-teens-try-to-rob-police-station/#more-9258PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — Two teenage boys are in big trouble after police said that they tried to rob a South Florida police station. “You know what, this is probably the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen,” Port St. Lucie Police spokesman Rob Vega said.Vega told WPBF News 25 that the two boys, ages 12 and 14, walked into the lobby of a regional station around 4:30 p.m. Wednesday and demanded money from an aide behind the glass enclosure.

Vega said the 12-year-old hid one hand under his jacket as if he had a gun. Another aide ran into the back screaming for help.

Within minutes, a half dozen officers, some with guns drawn, burst into the lobby and arrested the boys.

“In all my time here, whoever would have thought that someone would come to a police department and attempt to rob it. It’s unbelievable. It’s lucky that they’re only going to jail and not to the morgue,” Vega told WPBF.

Both boys have been charged with attempted armed robbery. The 14-year-old was also charged with violating his probation. MORE>>>

White Man Pummeled With Baseball Bat Over $1 Bill In Random Attack

March 13, 2008 3 comments

Video: Man Pummeled With Baseball Bat Over $1 Bill In Random Attack

http://www.local6.com/news/15572104/detail.html

ORLANDO, Fla. — A Central Florida man was ambushed and beaten with an aluminum baseball bat for a $1 bill in a random attack at a busy gas station.

Investigators said three men approached Nate Curtis at a Hess station gas station pump located on South Goldenrod Road in Orange County and wanted money.

“They asked me for a dollar and I said, ‘I don’t have a dollar,'” Curtis said. “Then, I was putting my wallet away and one of them had a baseball bat and hit me across the head. Another guy came out of nowhere and poured beer in my eyes and that was it, I couldn’t see because my eyes were burning.”

Curtis was then beaten by the men.”I have two fractures in my jaw, a fractured cheek bone and stitches in my chin,” Curtis said.Detectives said Curtis was randomly targeted.”These guys can victimize you just as easily as they did this gentleman,” Orange ounty sheriff’s Detective Jason Sams said.”It makes me sick that people are out there and like that,” Curtis said. “The should be behind bars. They shouldn’t be allowed out among people who just want to mind their own business and be in peace.”Curtis said the men were parked at the pump and were just looking for someone to beat up.Surveillance video captured one of the three men inside the store.Anyone with information about the crime is urged to call Crimeline at 800-423-TIPS.Watch Local 6 News for more on this story.

Eve Carson videos

http://podblanc.com/index.php?q=node/1465
Eve Carson videos courtesy of Podblanc.